PERFORMANCE ART IN LILLE 'ART UP!'

Connect Yourself / The City Cycle

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CONNECT YOURSELF

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Connect Yourself is a performance art project created in Lille Grand Palais for the 2014 edition of the contemporary art fair "Art Up!" (20 000 visitors). The concept is to build a physical social network, recreating the digital interactions into reality. This project is a parody of the excess of of virtual communications nowadays. Everything depends on the audience that interacts with the social network. To do this, a person has only to place himself on a slab that will "connect" him to someone else. One finds the gamification mechanics of social networks during the performance, that is to say a reward system where the participant gains points plus he seeks to know the person in front of him. The organisation performance team listen to the conversation of the "connected people" in order to give points. It illustrates and criticizes the lack of privacy on the social networks.
Acting as project leader on this performance, I had to manage a team and structure the concept so that it was viable during the event.
Will you cross the digital frontier to meet someone in real life?

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THE CITY CYCLE

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"The City Cycle" is a graphic performance that took place in Lille Grand Palais as part of the 6th edition of Lille Art Fair 2013 (15 000 visitors). This performance consists of building a miniature city from urban recycled elements. This city construction from another shows how urbanization is infinite: despite the destruction, the city evolves and rebuilds itself from elements of the past: This phenomenon is described as the cycle of the city. "The substance of the world is of a material nature; that is to say, nothing is created, nothing is lost, the elements of nature and their phenomena are sufficient to themselves, to their formation, to their movement and their development." In the same way, urbanization is infinite, mankind is constantly rebuilding from elements of the past.

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